Richard Bloomfield's Blog

Technology, Cycling and Singing in Dublin

By

UPC Ireland – Horizon Software Update

I wrote back in January about some of the interface problems with the Horizon box, and thankfully some of them seems to have been solved with a recent software update.

  • The general navigation speed seems to have increased
  • The dreaded “Delete Everything” option has been relocated to the depths of a Preference screen, where it can’t cause any damage
  • The much-anticipated “Delete Series” has finally appeared, and works pretty quickly.

I haven’t checked the other problems to see if they’re fixed, but just these few things make the service a bit easier to live with.

Has anyone else seen improvements?

By

A suitable punishment for drivers that use their mobile phone

If you take a look at the passing traffic in Dublin, it generally only takes a minute or two until you spot a driver using their mobile phone.

Clearly some drivers are not worried about the prospect of 3 points on their driver’s licence, or a mandatory court appearance and fine of up to €1,000 if they’re caught texting.  Or the fact that they’re 4 times more likely to crash when distracted on the phone.

So I got thinking about a more suitable punishment, that would be reasonably easy to implement, and would be an added deterrent to people. The Garda and courts, in addition to the other penalties, would be able to enforce a 6-month outgoing call/text ban on an offender’s mobile.

The ban on outgoing calls/texts would remove the temptation from drivers to pick up their phones when driving, and it would be an enormous inconvenience to offenders generally. Incoming calls/text would still be allowed for safety purposes, as would outgoing calls to the emergency services.

Of course, there’s nothing stopping people switching to a new phone number, but that’s a massive inconvenience in itself, and would be embarrassing to explain to friends and family.

By

UPC Horizon Wi-Free

Over the last few weeks UPC has rolled out a service in Ireland called Horizon Wi-Free.

The service allows UPC broadband customers who are visiting the homes of other UPC customers with a Horizon box to get free WiFi. You don’t need to ask your friends and family to share their WiFi password with you, because the Horizon box uses two different WiFi hotspots – one secured one for the home-owner’s use, and a public open one for visitors.

And once you set up your smartphone or tablet to connect to Horizon Wi-Free for the first time, it should automatically re-connect whenever you encounter another Wi-Free hotspot.

Some things to bear in mind if you were wanting to use Horizon Wi-Free in someone else’s home are:

  • You will need an active broadband subscription with UPC
  • You can connect up to 3 devices to Wi-Free at any one time (a limitation if you have multiple devices and a large family sharing the subscription)
  • You can expect restricted broadband speeds – a maximum of 2.5 megabit download and 0.5 megabit upload

That being said, I find it very useful to have WiFi available on my smartphone whenever I visit nearby family – especially as my family don’t tend to know their own WiFi password.

To set up Horizon Wi-Free on your UPC broadband subscription, you need to log in to “My UPC”, look down the list of “My Products” on the page and click on “Horizon Wi-Free”.  On the next page you’ll see a link to set or change your Wi-Free password. This will need to be a separate password to that used for your My UPC login.

Once you have set up the Wi-Free password, you’re free to ‘roam’ on other people’s WiFi.  You’ll need your UPC account username (as used for My UPC) and your newly created Wi-Free password to connect – but once your device is set up, you won’t need to keep re-entering it.

Here’s some instructions on setting up your smartphone or tablet.

By

Email Response Times

I was just emailing the Revenue this afternoon, and got one of those automated delivery receipt emails back from them.

After thanking me for my email and telling me that it will be processed as quickly as possible, their message then has the following line:

In line with our Customer Service Standards we endeavour to respond to 100% of emails within 30 working days.

What really? 30 days? Is that your target? Surely for a customer service team, they should have an SLA target response time measured in hours rather than days!

By

Cloning Remote Control Fobs

In my apartment block there’s an underground car park that’s accessed using a remote-control key fob. We have one allocated car parking spot down there, and as such the management company for the block only issued us with one key fob.

My wife uses the key fob for her car, but I also have a requirement to get in and out of the car park, because that’s where I lock up my bikes.

When we moved in around 18 months ago I approached the management company of the apartments to try and get a second remote control. And despite me explaining the situation, they refused to issue another one to me – even though I offered to pay the €70 they said it would cost.

After some discussion they reluctantly agreed to give me a key to the pedestrian gate, which I’ve been using ever since – but the inconvenience is annoying.

But then I was on the internet one day and found that you can buy cloning remote control fobs that can copy existing fobs, they’re less than a ten quid to buy, and they work perfectly!

Remote Control Cloning Key Fob

Remote Control Cloning Key Fob

I got myself one last week from an ebay seller, but they’re also available on Amazon and other places. The initial programming can be a little tricky to be begin with, but after that it works like a dream.

Obviously in order to clone a key fob you need an existing working fob for the gate/door:

  • To start the programming, press and hold the top two buttons (A and B) together for between 5-10 seconds, until the light blinks rapidly, and then release. This action puts the fob into learning mode, and also wipes any codes already stored on the fob, so if you want to program a new button you have to start again and program them all.
  • Touch the two key fobs together, and press and hold the button you want to program (say the A button) at the same time as the corresponding button on the original fob that you want to clone from. You may need to move the fobs around at different angles to pick up the signal in the cloning fob (end to side seems to work), and when you do the light will flash rapidly to say it’s finished learning. Then simply repeat the process for any other buttons you want to clone.

If you get into trouble, take a quick search on YouTube for key fob cloning tutorials.  When I first got my fob I thought it wasn’t working, but that’s because I wasn’t programming it correctly.

css.php